Charlie Rose sits down with Golden Bear for Masters week special

Jack Nicklaus with Charlie Rose

Jack Nicklaus with Charlie Rose

It was an interview almost a quarter-century in the making, but in the end, Charlie Rose and Jack Nicklaus made it count.

“We have been talking about getting together for almost 25 years,” Jack admits. “I’m glad we finally made it happen.”

So will viewers.

Rose visited last weekend the North Palm Beach home of Jack and Barbara Nicklaus, and sat down for more than an hour with the Golden Bear to tape an interview for “Charlie Rose,” the nightly one-hour interview program that appears nightly on PBS and also in prime time on Bloomberg Television in the United States and 100 countries around the world. The interview with Jack is expected to air Wednesday night on PBS at 11:00 p.m. ET (check your local listings), and re-air on Bloomberg TV on Thursday at 8:00 p.m. and 10:00 p.m. ET. In addition, an excerpt from the interview will be used on “CBS This Morning,” the daily morning show Rose co-hosts, on Wednesday or Thursday morning to coincide with the 50th anniversary of Jack’s first of a record six Masters Tournament titles.

The award-winning Rose asked Jack about myriad topics, including that 1963 win, the Golden Bear’s major championship legacy, his thoughts on other greats in the game, today’s players, and how Jack’s mix of power and finesse helped change the game of golf. They talked about how Nicklaus has been open to share his experiences and advice with today’s young players, from Rory McIlroy to 14-year-old Chinese amateur Tianlang Guan, who Jack will meet Wednesday at Augusta National. Guan, who goes by the nickname “Langly,” is the youngest participant in Masters Tournament history and a past winner of the Nicklaus Junior Championship and Mission Hills Jack Nicklaus Junior Championship.

Charlie and Jack also talked about golf course design, and the Golden Bear’s extensive work in China and other parts of Asia.

According to producers, the conversation represented only the second outdoors interview Charlie has done in the last 20 years.

“Charlie Rose” is seen by more than 1 million viewers on PBS, and its re-airs on Bloomberg reach the most affluent audience in all of cable. Bloomberg is distributed in more than 70 million homes in the US and over 310 million globally. “CBS This Morning” reaches close to 3 million viewers, a number that has consistently grown in the less than a year since its revamping.

Since 1991, Charlie Rose has done more in-depth hours with Nobel Laureates, and extraordinary men and women of science, politics, art, business, sports, technology, literature and entertainment than any other program in the world. These conversations have made the show a cultural and intellectual archive of our time, providing accessible profiles of the people who have influenced our world.

Each weeknight Charlie Rose creates programs that introduce new people, explore fresh ideas and illuminate difficult issues. Special series on science, education and Islam have probed even deeper. He is the recipient of the Legion d’honneur, numerous awards from the scientific and journalism communities, and many honorary degrees.