Muni Monday: Why more courses should focus on fewer golf balls

North Palm Beach in the morning.

North Palm Beach in the morning. Instagram/@sticgolf

Source: Dylan Dethier, “Muni Monday: Why more courses should focus on fewer golf balls“, Golf.com. February 24, 2020.

All of golf is abuzz about the single greatest development in golf journalism in 2020, the Dylan Dethier initiative known as Muni Monday. Dylan is picking up where Herb Wind left off. Late in his life, the tweedy New Yorker writer, just for the sport of it, would riff on Beck and chant in the town square, “(Public golf): It’s where it’s at! I got two lob wedges and a microphone.” Old Herb, like young Dylan, had that New England golfing sensibility that prizes, in golf and in other things, good value and water conservation.

Dylan and I played two enjoyable rounds on interesting public courses last year. One was in Aiken, S.C., on the Monday after a memorable Masters. (Tigah!) The other was at Jacksonville Beach Municipal, on a slip-out basis during the Sawgrass tournament. (Rory won, but I had to look it up.) Muni under this rubric is golf that’s open to all but at places where you will never hear the phrase stay-and-play package.

This hardly needs to be said: Part of the appeal here is that most muni golf is on courses can typically played with one ball. Oh, the joy. Why don’t more course architects talk about that?

Continue Reading…

Muni Monday: Why more courses should focus on fewer golf balls